#GlobalJustice Weekly—Endless violence in Libya

libya

A Libyan revolutionary fighter runs for cover in Sirte, Libya, October 2011. © AP Photo/ Manu Br

In global justice news this week: The ICC Prosecutor addresses the UN Security Council on Libya’s “seemingly endless cycle of violence”; Amnesty International calls for rejection of Kenyan and South African agenda proposals for the 14th Assembly of States Parties; and news on Kenya, Democratic Republic of Congo, Central African Republic and much more.

Addressing the UN Security Council on her investigation in Libya, ICC Prosecutor Fatou Bensouda this week said that the country remains “embroiled in a seemingly endless cycle of violence, large scale commission of crimes and chronic instability.”

The prosecutor called for greater action to end widespread impunity in Libya, warning that resource constraints in 2016 will impede her office’s ability to conduct investigations.

Separately, ICC President Silvia Fernández de Gurmendi called for cooperation and support for the Court at the UN General Assembly.

Build-up: 14th Assembly of States Parties
The Assembly of States Parties, the ICC’s governing body, will hold its 14th session from 18-26 November in The Hague. Amnesty International called for a rejection of proposals by Kenya and South Africa for additional agenda items at the Assembly. Civil society argues that the ICC’s proposed expansion still falls well short of meeting the significant demands on the court.

ICC investigations
Kenya: ICC judges have rejected a victims request to review a decision by the prosecutor to cease active investigation in case against Kenyan President Uhuru Kenyatta. Here’s a reminder of why the Kenya cases are at the ICC.

Democratic Republic of Congo: A witness in the case against Bosco Ntaganda alleged that only soldiers led by the Congolese militia leader were present in a besieged town where crimes are alleged to have occurred.

The Trust Fund for Victims submitted a plan for collective reparations to victims in the Thomas Lubanga case.

Central African Republic: A witness testified in private in the witness tampering case involving DRC politician and militia leader leader Jean-Pierre Bemba.

Darfur: Darfuri victims have withdrawn from the case against ICC fugitive Omar al-Bashir, saying they have lost hope for justice.

ICC preliminary examinations
Palestine: Palestinian leaders traveled to the Hague to submit to the ICC evidence of alleged Israeli war crimes in recent violence. New Zealand called for Israel to halt its settlements in the occupied territories and Palestinians to stop taking cases to the ICC.

Campaign for Global Justice
States can bolster their support for international justice by ratifying the Agreement on Privileges and Immunities of the ICC. Add your voice now to our November Campaign for Global Justice.

Civil society welcomed the DRC senate’s adoption of legislation implementing the ICC Rome Statute into national law.

South Africa may be reconsidering plans to withdraw from the ICC. The Dutch prime minister called on South Africa to stay with the Court.

During a regional seminar, Botswana pledged strong support for the ICC.

Parliamentarians for Global Actions’ Australian national group discussed the importance of the ICC.

What else is happening?
Could ISIS end up before the ICC for allegedly using chemical weapons?

The former ICC prosecutor said the United States could do much more for international justice.

Guatemala opened a new court to focus on grave crimes.

Sign up for our weekly updates for the latest #GlobalJustice news.

This entry was posted in #GlobalJusticeWeekly, Africa, ASP, Bemba, Central African Republic, Democratic Republic of Congo, ICC, Kenya, Middle East/North Africa, Ntaganda, Ruto/Sang and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to #GlobalJustice Weekly—Endless violence in Libya

  1. The above information shows the work of the International Criminal Court to make the world safer for all people. A continued support for the ICC is needed world wide.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s