#GlobalJustice Weekly – Large contribution boosts Trust Fund for Victims of ICC crimes

A former child soldier in the Democratic Republic of Congo. © Guy Oliver/IRIN

A former child soldier in the Democratic Republic of Congo. © Guy Oliver/IRIN

In Global Justice news this week: Large contribution boosts Trust Fund for Victims of ICC crimes; Joseph Kony and his Lord Resistance Army remain a serious threat to peace in war-torn CAR; ICC fugitive Omar al-Bashir is not expected to attend the China-Africa summit in South Africa and much more.

Large contribution boosts Trust Fund for Victims of ICC crimes
During a visit to the ICC this week, French Minister of Justice Christiane Taubira announced her country’s voluntary contribution of €750,000 to the Trust Fund for Victims (TFV), the largest contribution to the Fund made by France to date.

This substantive contribution follows the Fund’s submission of its first reparations plan early November 2015 in the Lubanga case, the ICC’s landmark first trial.

The ICC is the first international tribunal to provide reparations to victims, a key restorative feature of the Rome Statute, the Court’s founding treaty. In this regard, the TFV is in charge of implementing Court-ordered reparations awards and providing general assistance to victims of heinous crimes with voluntary contributions from donors.

Civil society has long been calling on states to contribute to the TFV in order to fully achieve the goal of a victims centered court.

ICC investigations
Central African Republic: UN panel affirms that ICC fugitive Joseph Kony and his Lord’s Resistance Army remain a serious threat to peace in war-torn CAR.

Kenya: ICC Prosecutor Fatou Bensouda claims her office has sufficient evidence to secure the conviction of Kenyan Deputy President William Ruto and broadcaster Joshua Sang.

Darfur: ICC fugitive Omar al-Bashir is not expected to attend the China-Africa summit in South Africa.

Democratic Republic of Congo: ICC convict Germain Katanga is set to return to the DRC after the Court reduced his sentence in November.

Côte d’Ivoire: Accountability and cooperation with the ICC are among Côte d’Ivoire’s agenda on human rights.

ICC preliminary examinations
Nigeria: Nigerian human rights defender vows to invoke the ICC for alleged war crimes in the country.

Campaign for Global Justice
On International Human Rights Day, the ICC president invites us to continue supporting international justice.

The parliament of the Netherlands approved the ratification of the Kampala Amendments to the ICC Rome Statute on war crimes and the crime of aggression.

What else is happening?
The UN marked the first International Day to commemorate victims of genocide on 9 December.

The UN calls for urgent political dialogue in Burundi as the risk of ethnic genocide grows in the country.

It is ‘essential‘ to refer North Korea to the ICC says UN Rights Chief.

The ICC president and Norwegian prime minister discussed the Court’s independence, universality of the Rome Statute and state cooperation.

A former ICC judge defends the Court’s record in the fight against impunity.

Liechtenstein invites members of the Assembly of States Parties for talks to strengthen the ICC.

The Sri Lankan government claims it is under no pressure to join the ICC.

The International Committee of the Red Cross and the government of Switzerland will unveil recommendations aimed at strengthening the Geneva Conventions.

The American Bar Association organized a high level online roundtable on the future relations between the ICC and the UN Security Council.

Sign up for our weekly updates to get the latest #GlobalJustice news.

 

This entry was posted in #GlobalJusticeWeekly, Al-Bashir, Central African Republic, Katanga and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

3 Responses to #GlobalJustice Weekly – Large contribution boosts Trust Fund for Victims of ICC crimes

  1. World wide support for the ICC is needed to assist in bringing about justice. The ICC is dedicated to the goal of International Justice.

  2. Pingback: The year in global justice 2015 |

  3. Pingback: The ICC’s year in numbers – 2015 |

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s